May 192013
 

Delhi was an important place for the Mughals, they built palaces and forts here and had the walled city built from 1638 to 1649. After the fall of the Mughal empire in 1857 the British moved the capital of India to Calcutta. The British built modern “New Delhi” to the south west of “Old Delhi” which became India’s capital again in 1931.
Modern Delhi is a mixture of several distinct areas, including: Old Delhi with its Mughal monuments and congested bazaars; New Delhi with its wide avenues, grand vistas and colonial mansions; and the Mehrauli Archaeological Park best known for the Qutub Minar.

 

  • Humayuns Tomb from the entrance, Delhi

    Humayuns Tomb from the entrance, Delhi

  • Qutub Minar, Delhi

    Qutub Minar, Delhi

  • Iron Pillar, Delhi

    Iron Pillar, Delhi

  • Gurudwara Bangla Sahib Sikh Temple, Delhi

    Gurudwara Bangla Sahib Sikh Temple, Delhi

  • Sikh Temple Kitchens, Delhi

    Sikh Temple Kitchens, Delhi

  • Red Fort, Delhi

    Red Fort, Delhi

  • Sawan Pavillion - Red Fort, Delhi

    Sawan Pavillion – Red Fort, Delhi

  • Old Delhi

    Old Delhi

  • Lakshmi Narayan Temple, Delhi

    Lakshmi Narayan Temple, Delhi

  • Jama Masjid -  Mosque, Delhi

    Jama Masjid – Mosque, Delhi

  • Qutub Minar, Delhi

    Qutub Minar, Delhi

  • Old Delhi

    Old Delhi

  • New Delhi - Secretariat Building

    New Delhi – Secretariat Building

  • Raj Ghat - Mahatma Gandhi's Tomb, Delhi

    Raj Ghat – Mahatma Gandhi's Tomb, Delhi

  • Ghiyath Aldin Tughluq Tomb, Delhi

    Ghiyath Aldin Tughluq Tomb, Delhi

  • India Gate, Delhi

    India Gate, Delhi

  • India Gate, Delhi

    India Gate, Delhi

Things to see

Qutub Minar

qutub_minar_1India’s tallest minar, Qutub Minar (Arabic for pole or axis), marks the site of the first muslim kingdom in northern India. Qutub Minar’s construction started in 1192 and is made of red sandstone and marble: it is a UNESCO World Heritage site. The tower has 379 stairs, is 72.5 metres high, and has a base diameter of 14.3 metres, which narrows to 2.7 metres at the top storey.

Iron  Pillar

Iron PillarAlso in the Qutub complex and close to the Minar is a metallurgical curiosity, the 7m high iron pillar. According to the traditional belief, anyone who can encircle the entire column with their arms, while standing with their back against the pillar, can have their wish granted. The amalgamation of different metals with iron produces a high degree of smoothness and has probably prevented any corrosion.

Humayun’s Tomb

800px-Humayun's_Tomb_Angle_ShotA UNESCO World Heritage site completed in 1572. Humayun was the second Mughal Emporer and this is the first example of a Mughal garden tomb. It is clearly an inspiration for later monuments including the Taj Mahal. It is perfectly symmetrical and truly impressive in terms of its size and intricate stone work.

Lakshminarayan temple

Lakshmi Narayan templeThe three-storied temple is built in the northern or style of Hindu temple architecture. The entire temple is adorned with carvings depicting the scenes from Hindu mythology. More than a hundred skilled artisans carved the icons of the temple. The construction of temple dedicated to Laxmi Narayana started in 1933, built by industrialist and philanthropist Baldeo Das Birla. One of the earliertst temples without caste restrictions as requested by Mahatma Gandhi.


India Gate

India GateThe 42 m high India Gate is the national monument of India. Situated in the heart of New Delhi, it was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens. Originally, a statue of George V, Emperor of India stood under the now vacant canopy in front of the India Gate, but it was removed to Coronation Park together with a number of other British Raj-era statues. Following India’s independence, the India Gate became the site of the Indian Army’s Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.


Raj Ghat

Raj Ghat - Mahatma Gandhi's tombRaj Ghat is a memorial to Mahatma Gandhi.  It is a simple black marble platform, often draped with garlands of orange marigolds, that marks the spot of Mahatma Gandhi’s cremation, on 31 January 1948, a day after his assassination. It is left open to the sky while an eternal flame burns perpetually at one end.


Chandni chowk

Old DelhiChandni Chowk or “Moonlit Square”, dates back to the foundation of the city of Shahjahanabad when the Mughal emperor, Shah Jahan established the Red Fort on the banks of the River Yamuna beside his newly founded capital city of Shahjahanabad. Even though today Chandni Chowk appears choked with religious and commercial activity, it retains its historical character and is the heart of old Dehli. Built in the 17th century, the market was once divided by canals for water supply and to reflect the moonlight.


Red Fort

Red FortThe Red Fort derives its name from the extensive use of red sandstone on the massive walls that surround the fort. The Moghal Emperor Shah Jahan commissioned the construction of the Red Fort in 1638 when he decided to shift his capital from Agra to Delhi. The fortress palace was an important focal point of the medieval city of Shahjahanabad (present day Old Delhi). It is a UNESCO World Heritage site.


Gurdwara Bangla Sahib

Gurudwara Bangla Sahib - Sikh templeGurdwara Bangla Sahib is the most prominent Sikh Gurdwara, or Sikh house of worship, in Delhi. All people, regardless of race or religion may eat in the Gurdwara kitchen, the food having been prepared by a mixture of gursikhs who work there and volunteers.

Itineraries

We organise an itinerary specifically to your requirements. Do as much or as little as you like – the choice is yours. Local English speaking guides will ensure that you make the most of your sightseeing time. A private, air conditioned, chauffeur driven car will transport you between your chosen locations & provides an unforgettable experience in itself!

Click on itinerary title to go to separate detailed itinerary page.

The Golden Triangle

The “Golden Triangle” classically refers to the three “jewels in the northern Indian crown” of Delhi, Agra and Jaipur.

The tour starts in Delhi where you will be able to spend a short time seeing the contrasting sites of the New and Old cities before travelling to Agra. Here you will see the indescribable Taj Mahal and the facinating deserted Mughal city of Fatehpur Sikri.

This tour concludes in Rajasthan with the vibrant “Pink City” of Jaipur: a city full of captivating ancient palaces and forts,with most of them boasting stunning views and elaborate architecture.

Golden Triangle with Ranthambore

The “Golden Triangle” classically refers to the three “jewels in the northern Indian crown” of Delhi, Agra and Jaipur.

The tour starts in Delhi where you will be able to spend a short time seeing the contrasting sites of the New and Old cities before travelling to Agra. Here you will see the indescribable Taj Mahal and the facinating deserted Mughal city of Fatehpur Sikri.

This tour includes the Rajasthan highlights of Ranthambore National Park, famous for its tigers, and  the vibrant “Pink City” of Jaipur: a city full of captivating ancient palaces and forts, with most of them boasting stunning views and elaborate architecture.